PURPURA, NONPALPABLE

By Gary M. White, MD

For distal Extremity purpura, e.g. purple toes, see Toe, Purpura.

Solar Purpura
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Abuse

Amyloid, All Types
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Bruising
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Capillaritis
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Contact Dermatitis, Purpuric Patches of purpura at sites of contact. May see purpuric patch test reaction.

Cystic Fibrosis: Purpura on the legs in the second or third decade with burning preceding. Fades in 7-14 days but recurs. Arthralgias often associated. One case of cryoglobulins. Biopsy shows a vasculitis.

Cupping
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Dermatothlasia: The uncontrollable desire to pinch or otherwise manipulate the skin causing purpura.

Easy Bruising Syndrome

Gardner Diamond Syndrome

Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

Drug-induced purpuric eruptions. Penicillamine [AD 1989;125;95], Lenalidomide [JAAD;2011;65;654]

Purpura Fulminans
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Rubella

Scurvy Courtesy Eliot Mostow, MD
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Strongyloidiasias

Suction Purpura
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Thrombocytopenic Purpura

Acute Purpura With Fever

Purpura Fulminans

Sepsis, e.g. Bacteria, Fungal, Candida. Here in a patient with disseminate intravascular coagulation.
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Disseminated Candida krusei infection in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia Dermatology Online Journal 21;11

Meningococcemia
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Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Typhus and other ricketsial disease, see for example, [Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2010;82;691].

Retiform Purpura

Cryoglobulinemia

Newborn

Similar look to the blueberry muffin baby.
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Cytomegalovirus
Herpes Simpex
Rubella
Syphilis
Toxoplasmosis
Purpura Fulminans secondary to hereditary deficiencies of coagulation factors.

Child

Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis

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